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Get married to a japanese man

They are males in a highly conservative patriarchal society, so they enjoy all the benefits: status, money, career. On top of that, foreigners often attract a lot of Japanese girls. Their Japanese girlfriends or wives will take care of the majority of things for them. Their careers, especially teaching ones, also may not require Japanese proficiency. They are never subjected to sexual harassment, abuse or sexism. Jim, an American in his late 20s, used to be a very passionate young man.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: This Holographic Anime Character Could Be Your Next Girlfriend (HBO)

Content:
SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Why people aren't getting married in Japan

Spare a thought for the Western men trapped in Japan

Would you marry someone whose nationality differs from your own? International marriage is a topic interesting to many people in Japan and elsewhere but really spoken in depth by few. What was their experience like? Did they find it hard to adapt?

Was the relationship seamless to develop? Did they have any problems not necessarily related to their partner? What are the pros and cons of marrying a Japanese woman? To get more of a sense of cultural differences and similarities, we spoke with a few expats who are currently residing in Japan with a Japanese spouse to get their take on things.

In recent years, these numbers are again on the rise. These numbers probably reflect the global international blurring of boundaries and the sharing of cultures.

Our Expats: American, British, Italian We contacted some non-Japanese nationals who are married to Japanese citizens and asked them to cover some topics that we found many people are interested in knowing more about. We asked each of them for their opinions on several different points about international married life and how they approach daily life with their partner. We wondered how different it was to get married to someone from an entirely different cultural background, so we asked our interviewees this: "Do you think it's different to be with a Japanese partner when compared to people from your country?

Why or why not? One is the language barrier. Ultimately, it strengthens the relationship. This summer I noticed that a hornet queen was starting to build a nest right outside our front door.

As it was still very small, I grabbed a lighter and a screwdriver and took care of it myself. My Japanese wife was utterly shocked that I would do such a thing; she would have called the city office as a matter of course.

Brian USA : Absolutely yes! Essentially people are people. However what shapes each and every person are things such as religious believes, things such as their upbringing, television shows and culture in general, so when being with a Japanese spouse, something that may be common knowledge or common practice for one partner may be totally alien to another partner.

That in itself can bring about tension in a relationship. Italy : There are many differences in terms of culture, mannerism, tradition, way of living, but generally speaking, aside from the aforementioned items, I think that it really depends on the partner, rather than on their nationality. I believe that had I found a spouse of a different nationality, but with similar personality traits, we would have had a very similar life and lifestyle.

Tim USA : Different, yes. When you are both coming from the same or similar culture, you have a large set of shared cultural references from which to draw — so things like humor and understanding what is unsaid in a conversation and why can be much easier at times.

Here, we asked specifically this: "Have you ever felt that, if something happens that makes you want to end your relationship, you might not be able to because you depend on your partner for your visa, or other aspects of your life in Japan? I was already established as a single guy in Japan, with a job, an apartment, taking care of all my own taxes and other matters. I like to be independent as much as possible.

Brian : Sure there are times when I myself have felt that way. Our properties belong to one or the other, or both of us. Truthfully I believe that this could be a problem almost only in cases one settled oneself in a country through marriage, as opposed to already having been independent before the marriage. Tim : Not in the slightest. Paul : Easy decision for us because I had already been living and working in Japan for years when we met. As I had a career, friends and a network, I never considered leaving.

We might leave one day, as we would love to have the experience of living in a third country not Japan or my home country but that depends on my work. Japan is by far better bet for us, in terms of living standards and career opportunities for me. Brian : We got married in Japan and we decided to live in Japan because we were already here also my place of employment was in Japan at the time.

Later in life we met again when I moved to Japan. Things happened rather organically, and I had already decided I wanted to live in Japan before thinking about getting married.

We do entertain the idea of maybe moving to my country in the distant future, but as things are now, both of us are happy here and we are building our future in Japan. Tim : For me, it was a choice that was kind of made for us: my Japanese wife has no experience in living abroad; meanwhile at that point I had been living in Japan for over 13 years. It was more of a decision of practicality. If my wife relocated with me in the States, she would be starting her life over — career and social circle included.

I would be as well, given my commitment to Japan. Given that we married in our late 30s, this would represent a sizable jump backward for both of our careers as we sought to re-establish ourselves. I kind of joke about it, but it was easy for me to decide to marry my wife; the decision to also marry her country as well was what I had to mull over. Paul : No, my Japanese wife took my name.

I have never considered taking a Japanese name. Brian : No, As the male in the relationship I felt a strong need for my wife to take my last name as is tradition in my family. There are several reasons, but honestly, the main one is a strange sense of pride in holding my family name added to the idea that I would like to, one day, pass it on.

Tim : No, because I did not see the need to. Nor did she take my last name. Japanese culture is still rather conservative in many ways, and when a Japanese national has a foreign surname, it can inadvertently cause certain prejudgments to arise. Paul : Not in the slightest. I have PR, and except for voting it grants me all the rights and freedoms I need. Note: unlike some other countries, Japan does not allow citizens to hold a dual citizenship even Japan born citizens holding a dual nationality are required to choose one by the age of It is important to know, though, that while the law does not allow dual citizenship, hundreds of thousands of people still hold a double passport, and the government, to date, has never cracked down on any of them.

The subject of dual citizenship in Japan is still quite confusing, also because of the ambiguous rules put in place by the government in Japan. Brian : No, not at all. I have a permanent visa and that is enough for me. Tim : I'm very proud to be an American citizen. I've been having exactly this conversation with a few other long-term expats - folks who have been living in Japan already for years, who are looking at the future.

Paul : Not sure. We work Monday to Friday, we watch Netflix in the evenings and eat together, we go shopping or go on day trips on the weekends and spend time with friends I guess life is pretty similar for people of our situation in most developed economies nowadays. Brian : I think married life around the world is pretty much the same anywhere you go with some slight exceptions.

Generally speaking just like most married couples with children around the world you spend most of your free time with your kids and every now and then you try to find some time away from the kids for you and your wife to have a date night or have couples time.

Weekends become a repeat of laundry and shopping for groceries taking kids to soccer matches, etc. H : While, in general, life in the household is similar between Japan and my country again, I do believe it depends on the individuals , when it comes to life in general there are some differences.

Most of these things are expected for example, helping people understand why a Japanese person would introduce oneself with a foreign last name. Also, we live in a rural area, and people, generally, are not used to seeing international married couples. All in all, though, when it comes to important things such as renting or buying a house, getting a car, putting bills under our name, getting insurance, etc, there is no relevant difference. Paul : It can be a nice talking point; I know my Japanese wife gets lots of curious questions about her unusual family name.

Brian : The benefit of being a foreigner married to a Japanese citizen in Japan is a matter of perspective. For example I personally feel that being married to a Japanese citizen gives me more access to things that have traditionally been foreigner-unfriendly. Certainly, if one were to look at the visa, such a situation does open a lot more doors professionally, for example. If anything, it's wonderful to be able to get to know another culture by having a native introduce me to things I probably would not have discovered on my own.

Paul : As I mentioned, as little as possible, though in practice she probably shoulders more of the really complicated stuff just to get it done quicker. I was doing for myself for years, albeit with some mistakes and quite slowly, so I could do it alone again if I had to. Brian : I work for a Japanese company thus my level of Japanese might be better than most however the roles of my household are still very traditional in the sense that I go to work, make the money [while] my wife takes care of household duties.

Many of the utility bills I have set up on an automatic debit from my bank account and in the event that I need to communicate with electric gas water company reps we sometimes take turns. Tim : Very little, if at all. Paul : We are not traditionally Japanese as a couple.

She works too. We share the cooking and cleaning. Brian : In my hometown we always designated a set day for doing certain tasks for example Saturday was considered laundry day; Sunday was considered grocery day.

In Japan it is very different, usually my wife goes shopping every single day for groceries. Usually laundry is done every single day. In American households, often chores such as taking out the trash, washing the dishes, folding the laundry etc. This practice is a way for the children to learn responsibility and often to earn their allowance. In Japan it would seem that household chores such as these are rarely done by children. Perhaps this is one of the biggest differences in American versus Japanese upbringing.

Some differences derive by how we are used to handling things. I like to fix what needs to be fixed, do yard work, and so on by myself. My spouse is ready to pick up the phone and call a professional at the first sight of a leaking faucet. In my country we tend to be stricter with kids and we have them work chores although I do believe that kids in Japan are already worked enough as it is. The division of tasks in the household depends on people.

So I Married a Japanese Man

A sharply dressed crowd of Japanese singletons shuffle awkwardly around conference-room tables, exchanging small-talk and CVs in an attempt to find a marriage partner -- all of them accompanied by their parents. One year-old woman, who declined to give her name, said she "didn't have the courage" to find a spouse and move away from her mother, who had come with her to the match-making party. And while people of this age routinely express a wish to get married, outdated social attitudes and increasing economic pressure is making tying the knot more and more difficult, experts say. Sociology professor Masahiro Yamada from Tokyo's Chuo University told AFP that the norm of single people living with their parents until marriage means there is less immediate pressure to find a partner. Although long-term financial security with a husband or wife is seen as important, the difficulty of finding affordable housing adds to the incentive to stay with mum and dad, he said.

This project was supported by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting. This year, however, the bespectacled school administrator bucked conventional norms.

Many Japanese men are struggling to get their foot into the dating scene and get married because of the stagnant economic situation in Japan. There has been a significant drop in opportunities for permanent positions following the burst of the bubble economy in the s and the health of the national economy has remained stagnant ever since. Expenses like mortgage, education and pensions appear to be insurmountable obstacles for Japanese men to consider the option of raising a family and having children. Financial challenges are even more daunting for temporary contract workers, such as in retail and construction, who are plagued with perpetually low wages and little prospects of career advancement.

Before You Get Married To A Japanese Man

My husband and I got married in America and shortly thereafter moved to Japan—where I proceeded to run headfirst into all sorts of unintentionally offensive questions and comments. Here are a few of my favorites:. However, people have this idea so fixed in their heads that when they meet a foreign woman me happily married to a Japanese man my husband , they have to press the issue. People are more than their nationality. I love [insert name] for who he is—and that has nothing to do with his ethnicity. I get this question a lot from Japanese women—even strangers on the train. A lot of Japanese men do not respect their wives. Excuse me.

Beyond dimensions: The man who married a hologram

Would you marry someone whose nationality differs from your own? International marriage is a topic interesting to many people in Japan and elsewhere but really spoken in depth by few. What was their experience like? Did they find it hard to adapt? Was the relationship seamless to develop?

And people will say the number-one reason is economic insecurity. This may seem surprising in Japan, a country where the economy is currently humming along, and the unemployment rate is below 3 percent.

If you are an American planning to marry in Japan, the process is straightforward. With some planning, most people can complete all the things needed to get married in less than one day. Servicemen and women may have additional steps to take to marry in Japan; contact your unit personnel officer or chain of command. If you wish to marry in Japan, you must do so according to Japanese law.

Marriage in Japan

Marriage in Japan is a legal and social institution at the center of the household. Couples are legally married once they have made the change in status on their family registration sheets , without the need for a ceremony. Most weddings are held either according to Shinto traditions or in chapels according to Christian marriage traditions. Traditionally, marriages were categorized into two types according to the method of finding a partner— omiai , meaning arranged or resulting from an arranged introduction, and ren'ai , in which the husband and wife met and decided to marry on their own—although the distinction has grown less meaningful over postwar decades as Western ideas of love have altered Japanese perceptions of marriage.

Marriage in Japan Now. A recent Japanese government report showed that as of , Approximately half of respondents, According to Uekusa Miyuki, who heads the Tokyo matchmaking agency Marry Me, there are numerous factors that have led to the large number of unmarried people in Japan. Then one day they wake up to find they are in their mid-thirties and still single. She says another factor is that women are now more active in society.

Japan’s Unmarried Masses Face Mounting Obstacles to Matrimony

If you have not read my past articles regarding convenience stores yet, take a look at them, please! Is This a Trap of Convenience or What? Even after writing these articles, my curiosity had never stopped and I had kept finding people who were willing to talk about their work at convenience stores. And I was able to have very valuable interviews with various people in Tokyo. I will write the survey results bit by bit, and today I would like to share what bothers most the people who work at convenience stores. Most of the interviewees said that they felt frustrated when customers made orders by just telling them bluntly the names of the products they wanted.

Akihiko Kondo's mother refused an invitation to her only son's wedding in Tokyo this month, but perhaps that Nov 13, - Uploaded by CGTN.

Кто-то постучал в дверь. - Войдите, - буркнул Нуматака. Массажистка быстро убрала руки из-под полотенца. В дверях появилась телефонистка и поклонилась: - Почтенный господин. - Слушаю.

- Давайте ближе к сути дела. Агент Колиандер нажал несколько кнопок, и кадры стали сменяться быстрее. Люди на подиуме с нетерпением ждали, когда на экране появится их бывший сослуживец Энсей Танкадо. Ускоренное проигрывание видеозаписи придавало изображению некоторую комичность.

Его план не сработал. Почему она не хочет ему поверить. Росио подошла к нему еще ближе. - Я не знаю, кто вы такой и чего хотите, но если вы немедленно отсюда не уйдете, я вызову службу безопасности отеля и настоящая полиция арестует вас за попытку выдать себя за полицейского офицера.

Казалось, старик испытал сильнейшее разочарование. Он медленно откинулся на гору подушек.

Она сказала ему, что их брак исчерпал себя, что она не собирается до конца дней жить в тени другой женщины. Вой сирен вывел его из задумчивости. Его аналитический ум искал выход из создавшегося положения. Сознание нехотя подтверждало то, о чем говорили чувства.

Беккер остановился, недоумевая, откуда им известно его имя. - Кто… кто вы. - Пройдемте с нами, пожалуйста. Сюда. В этой встрече было что-то нереальное - нечто, заставившее снова напрячься все его нервные клетки. Он поймал себя на том, что непроизвольно пятится от незнакомцев.

В свете ламп дневного света он сумел разглядеть под красноватой припухлостью смутные следы каких-то слов, нацарапанных на ее руке. - Но глаза… твои глаза, - сказал Беккер, чувствуя себя круглым дураком.

 - Почему они такие красные.

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