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How can a woman get testosterone

Some try testosterone to boost a sagging libido, but this therapy is still unproven in women. You've probably seen those TV ads targeted to men with "low T," a drop in testosterone level that often occurs with age. Because this male hormone is an instrumental component in sexual desire, declining libido is a common symptom of "low T. Women's bodies also produce testosterone. In fact, we use it to make a form of estrogen called estradiol.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Testosterone in Women: Friend or Enemy ?

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Low Testosterone Therapy

Testosterone and Women’s Health

Not applicable since all data that are referred to in this article will have been obtained through reading original studies or contacting the authors of cited studies.

Testosterone therapy for women is in widespread use, primarily in the form of compounded preparations and off-label use of formulations for men. The benefits and risks of such therapy remain uncertain. This review will identify and evaluate studies that have examined the effects of testosterone therapy for women on a range of outcomes including sexual function, cardiovascular events, metabolic parameters, musculoskeletal health, wellbeing, cancer events, androgenic effects and withdrawal rates.

Assessing a range of outcomes, we will assess the risk-of-bias of relevant studies and draw conclusions about the strength of evidence for benefits and risks of testosterone therapy for each outcome. This comprehensive systematic review with meta-analysis will provide the foundation for the development of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines that will address benefits and risks of testosterone therapy, when treatment might be appropriate or inappropriate, areas of clinical uncertainty and the basis for assessment and monitoring of patients.

Testosterone has important physiological roles in female reproductive and non-reproductive health. There is a physiological decline in testosterone with age that commences prior to natural menopause [ 2 — 4 ]. The greatest decline in circulating testosterone occurs during the late reproductive years [ 2 ].

Testosterone is often prescribed to improve sexual function in postmenopausal women presenting with low libido [ 5 ]. However, concern about the safety has been a major obstacle for the approval of testosterone therapies for women. Consequently, in most countries, testosterone therapy for women is off-label, such that the prescribed therapies are either formulations approved for men with dose modification or compounded therapy [ 6 ].

A systematic review of testosterone therapy for women indicated favourable effects on sexual function [ 5 ]. However, at the time this was published, limited safety data were available. Subsequent studies have provided further efficacy and safety data. Testosterone is administered to postmenopausal women with concurrent estrogen [ 7 , 8 ] or estrogen plus progestogen therapy [ 9 , 10 ] or to premenopausal women [ 11 , 12 ], and postmenopausal women not using other sex steroid therapy [ 13 ].

The Endocrine Society published recommendations for the use of androgens in postmenopausal women in that included recommendations for the use of testosterone [ 14 ]. With the increasing use of compounded therapies that include testosterone, combined with the uncertainty of the role of testosterone therapy, there is a compelling need for a systematic review incorporating the more recently published clinical trials of testosterone for women that includes all modes of systemic administration studied and indications for use.

This review will therefore assess the benefits and risks of using testosterone therapy for women, including effects on measures of sexual function, cardiovascular events, metabolic parameters, musculoskeletal health and wellbeing. The final search results will be limited to controlled clinical trials or randomised controlled trials and humans.

The reference lists of retrieved studies will be searched to identify other potentially eligible trials or ancillary publications. We will include randomised placebo-controlled clinical trials RCTs published between January and July This includes crossover and parallel group designs. Studies published prior to will be excluded as the effect of testosterone was not systematically investigated prior to Systemic testosterone therapy administered as a transdermal or oral preparation, intra-muscular injection or subcutaneous implant.

Identical appearing placebo therapy. Any concomitant therapies will be required to be the same in the intervention and comparator groups. Concomitant therapies will include estrogen alone or estrogen plus progestogen therapy. The primary outcomes will be the effects of testosterone therapy on sexual function, cardiovascular events, metabolic parameters, cognitive function and musculoskeletal health.

For example, the sexual function outcomes includes satisfying sexual events, total sexual function scores, and scores for sexual desire, arousal, orgasm, pleasure, concerns, responsiveness, sexual self-image and sexual distress. Secondary outcomes will include the effects of testosterone therapy on androgenic effects, cancer events, mood and wellbeing, and discontinuation rate. For example, the secondary outcome of androgenic effects includes acne, alopecia, clitoromegaly, increased hair growth and voice change.

After elimination of duplicates, two review authors RI, RB will independently scan the abstract, title or both, of every record retrieved to determine which potential studies should be assessed further. All potentially relevant articles will be evaluated as a full text.

Any discrepancy of a particular study will be resolved through discussion by the review team members. For studies that fulfil inclusion criteria, two review authors RI, RB will independently abstract key participant and intervention characteristics and report data on efficacy outcomes and adverse events. A standardised form will be developed and piloted based on the template of the Cochrane data abstraction form [ 16 ].

Any disagreements will be resolved by discussion, or if required by a third author SD. In case of duplicate publications or multiple reports of a primary study, all available data will be collated and the most complete dataset aggregated across all known publications will be used.

Two review authors RI, RB will assess the risk of bias of each included study independently. We will assess risk of bias using the Cochrane risk of bias tool [ 16 , 17 ]. The impact of individual bias domains on study results at the endpoint and study levels will be summarised. For blinding of participants and personnel performance bias , detection bias blinding of outcome assessors and attrition bias incomplete outcome data , the intention is to evaluate risk of bias separately for subjective sexual function, wellbeing and objective lipid profiles, bone density outcomes [ 18 ].

Continuous data will be expressed as standardised mean difference CIs , while categorical data will be presented as risk ratio or absolute risk. We will take into account the level at which randomisation occurred, such as crossover trials and multiple observations for the same outcome.

Authors will be contacted regarding missing data if feasible. Evaluation of the important numerical data such as screened, randomised participants as well as intention-to-treat and as-treated will be undertaken. We will investigate attrition rates, e. Where standard deviations for outcomes are not reported, we will impute these values by assuming the standard deviation of the missing outcome to be the average of the standard deviations from those studies where this information was reported.

We will investigate the impact of imputation on meta-analyses by means of sensitivity analyses. In the event of substantial clinical, methodological or statistical heterogeneity, we will not report study results as the pooled effect estimate in a meta-analysis. Heterogeneity using the I 2 statistic, which quantifies inconsistency across studies, will be examined to assess the impact of heterogeneity on the meta-analysis [ 19 ].

When heterogeneity is found, we will attempt to determine potential reasons for it by examining individual study and subgroup characteristics. Between-studies variation will be quantified using the DerSimonian-Laird random effects models. Funnel plots will be generated to assess small study effects if we include 10 studies or more that investigate a particular outcome.

Owing to several possible explanations for funnel plot asymmetry, we will interpret results carefully [ 20 ]. Quantitative data will, where possible, be pooled in a statistical meta-analysis using RevMan 5. Where statistical pooling is not possible, for example breast cancer events, the findings will be presented in narrative form where appropriate. We will carry out the following subgroup analyses and plan to investigate interaction. Sensitivity analyses will be undertaken, when applicable, in order to explore the influence of the following factors on effect sizes:.

We will also test the robustness of the results by repeating the analysis using different measures of effect size such as mean difference, absolute risk, risk ratio , and our default model will be random-effects.

Despite the prescribing of testosterone to women which is occurring globally [ 21 ], primarily for the treatment of low libido [ 22 ], internationally agreed guidelines for the use of testosterone in women are lacking. This systematic review, with meta-analysis, will provide a comprehensive systematic analysis of clinical studies that have examined the effects of systematic testosterone therapy in women on sexual function, cardiovascular events, metabolic parameters, musculoskeletal health and wellbeing.

Strengths of this review include searching all the major clinical medicine data bases and the references of retrieved articles, not limiting our search to English publications, and recontacting authors for missing data.

Although we cannot fully anticipate the limitations of our review, it is possible that we will not be able to get access to all studies published in languages other than English. This review will provide a critical basis for the development of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the indications and contra-indications to therapy, the benefits and risks of therapy, the areas of clinical uncertainty and the assessment and monitoring of patients.

SRD developed the initial review concept. RMI and SRD drafted the manuscript, and all authors read, contributed to, and approved the final draft. The other authors declare that they have no competing interests. Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations. Rakibul M. Robin J. Bell, Email: ude. Sally Green, Email: ude. Susan R. Davis, Email: ude. National Center for Biotechnology Information , U.

Journal List Syst Rev v. Syst Rev. Published online Jan Islam , 1 Robin J. Bell , 1 Sally Green , 2 and Susan R. Davis 1. Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer. Corresponding author. Received Aug 21; Accepted Jan 3. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Associated Data Data Availability Statement Not applicable since all data that are referred to in this article will have been obtained through reading original studies or contacting the authors of cited studies.

Abstract Background Testosterone therapy for women is in widespread use, primarily in the form of compounded preparations and off-label use of formulations for men. Discussion This comprehensive systematic review with meta-analysis will provide the foundation for the development of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines that will address benefits and risks of testosterone therapy, when treatment might be appropriate or inappropriate, areas of clinical uncertainty and the basis for assessment and monitoring of patients.

Table 1 Search terms used to identify relevant studies in electronic databases. Final search terms: 13 AND 14 limited by randomised controlled trial and humans. Open in a separate window. Searching other resources The reference lists of retrieved studies will be searched to identify other potentially eligible trials or ancillary publications.

Intervention Systemic testosterone therapy administered as a transdermal or oral preparation, intra-muscular injection or subcutaneous implant.

Types of outcome measures Primary outcomes The primary outcomes will be the effects of testosterone therapy on sexual function, cardiovascular events, metabolic parameters, cognitive function and musculoskeletal health.

Secondary outcomes Secondary outcomes will include the effects of testosterone therapy on androgenic effects, cancer events, mood and wellbeing, and discontinuation rate. Data collection and analysis Selection of studies After elimination of duplicates, two review authors RI, RB will independently scan the abstract, title or both, of every record retrieved to determine which potential studies should be assessed further. Data extraction and management For studies that fulfil inclusion criteria, two review authors RI, RB will independently abstract key participant and intervention characteristics and report data on efficacy outcomes and adverse events.

Unhealthy Testosterone Levels In Women: Causes and Symptoms

Not applicable since all data that are referred to in this article will have been obtained through reading original studies or contacting the authors of cited studies. Testosterone therapy for women is in widespread use, primarily in the form of compounded preparations and off-label use of formulations for men. The benefits and risks of such therapy remain uncertain. This review will identify and evaluate studies that have examined the effects of testosterone therapy for women on a range of outcomes including sexual function, cardiovascular events, metabolic parameters, musculoskeletal health, wellbeing, cancer events, androgenic effects and withdrawal rates. Assessing a range of outcomes, we will assess the risk-of-bias of relevant studies and draw conclusions about the strength of evidence for benefits and risks of testosterone therapy for each outcome.

Androgen deficiency in women is a topic that the medical community has been slow to address. This is partially attributed to the fact that the most common symptom is decreased libido, a very common nonspecific complaint that has long been associated with the psychological issues of stress and depression. One of the earliest reports showing an association between decreased sexual desire and decreased testosterone in women was published in , but acceptance of this association has been slow.

Testosterone is an important female hormone. Healthy young women produce approximately — mcg per day. This represents three to four times the amount of estrogen produced by the ovaries. Approximately half of endogenous testosterone and precursors are derived from the ovaries e.

Testosterone for women

When it comes to sex hormones, women are driven by estrogen and men are driven by testosterone , right? In men, testosterone is mainly produced in the testes. Every person has testosterone. Female sex hormones include:. Female bodies readily convert testosterone and other androgens they produce into female sex hormones. Both females and males experience an initial surge of testosterone and estrogen during puberty, which lasts through young adulthood. This production of sex hormones contributes to the development of secondary sex characteristics. These include deep voices and facial hair and higher voices and breast development.

Tools for Clinicians

Research shows that the hormone testosterone may improve sexual function in specific groups of women, but data on safety and effectiveness are limited. The long-term safety of testosterone therapy for women also is unknown. Given the limited research on effectiveness and safety and the number of potential serious side effects, testosterone isn't a common treatment for sexual dysfunction. Long-term safety data on testosterone therapy for postmenopausal women who have a history of breast or uterine cancer or those who have cardiovascular or liver disease is lacking. Testosterone therapy comes in many forms, such as creams, gels, patches or pills.

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You may think of testosterone as male hormone, but women make this hormone too. It is just one of the sex hormones that women produce, along with oestrogen and progesterone. Levels of testosterone in your body gradually reduce as you become older, with many women not even noticing. Others are more sensitive to the changes and sometimes benefit from extra testosterone.

Testosterone therapy: Is it for women?

Until the recent media attention on the high-level track athlete Caster Semenya , who is barred from competing because of high testosterone levels, this hormone was primarily perceived as a male-only hormone. It is actually an important hormone for women too, helping to produce new blood cells, maintain bone health and libido, and boost other reproductive hormones. There are biological causes for increased testosterone in women. One such cause may be polycystic ovary syndrome PCOS , a condition in which the ovaries or adrenal glands produce more male hormones than normal.

Although not in the same abundance as men, women also produce the androgen hormone testosterone in their ovaries and adrenal glands. It keeps bones healthy. The correct amount of testosterone supports bone growth and strength, while too much or too little can harm them. It promotes cognitive health. Another found that higher testosterone levels in the plasma of premenopausal women was linked to better performance in mathematical and spatial-relations tasks. It maintains sex drive.

Important Announcement

JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser. Testosterone belongs to a group of hormones known as androgens and is often thought of as the male sex hormone that gradually decreases with age. As a result, men may be treated with FDA-approved testosterone products to improve their sex drive and also other symptoms. Female adrenal glands and ovaries produce small amounts of this hormone in order to make estradiol, a form of estrogen. The main reason why some women are interested in taking testosterone is for improvement of sexual function. It also may improve muscle strength, bone density, and mood although this remains controversial. Unfortunately, no testosterone products are currently FDA-approved for women.

and medications associated with your transition from female to male. Many people are eager for hormonal changes to take place rapidly—I understand that.

And because testosterone is a key hormone in the body—in women and men alike—a testosterone imbalance can have quite an impact on your health and well-being. So keep reading to learn more about unhealthy levels of testosterone in women—including causes and symptoms. Do women have testosterone? Related: Low testosterone in men. In fact, women usually have higher testosterone levels than estradiol levels.

All About Testosterone in Women

Testosterone is produced by the gonads by the Leydig cells in testes in men and by the ovaries in women , although small quantities are also produced by the adrenal glands in both sexes. It is an androgen, meaning that it stimulates the development of male characteristics. Present in much greater levels in men than women, testosterone initiates the development of the male internal and external reproductive organs during foetal development and is essential for the production of sperm in adult life. This hormone also signals the body to make new blood cells, ensures that muscles and bones stay strong during and after puberty and enhances libido both in men and women.

Attention women: Low sex drive? Testosterone won’t help

Hypoactive sexual desire disorder HSDD is characterized by the absence of sexual fantasies and desire for sexual activity. Male sexual dysfunction has been extensively researched, but there is less evidence addressing the treatment of HSDD in women, particularly with regard to the use of androgen therapy. There are no FDA-approved testosterone treatments for women, despite the fact that 4 million prescriptions have been written off-label for HSDD. This highlights the need for more research on safety, efficacy, side effects, and transference issues.

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Вирус. - Никакого вируса. Выслушай меня внимательно, - попросил Стратмор. Сьюзан была ошеломлена. ТРАНСТЕКСТ еще никогда не сталкивался с шифром, который не мог бы взломать менее чем за один час.

Androgen Therapy in Women

- Мы нашли Северную Дакоту. Вызовите службу безопасности. И давайте выбираться отсюда. Стратмор поднял руку, давая понять, что ему нужно подумать. Сьюзан опасливо перевела взгляд в сторону люка. Его не было видно за корпусом ТРАНСТЕКСТА, но красноватое сияние отражалось от черного кафеля подобно огню, отражающемуся ото льда.

Я расскажу, что Цифровая крепость - это большая липа, и отправлю на дно все ваше мерзкое ведомство. Стратмор мысленно взвешивал это предложение. Оно было простым и ясным. Сьюзан остается в живых, Цифровая крепость обретает черный ход.

Comments: 2
  1. Voll

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  2. Kagazuru

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